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How to cure snoring naturally with nettle?

Snoring often goes unnoticed as a disease, but it is not taken seriously. Snoring is a risky habit! 75% of people who snore suffer from obstructive sleep apnea. It means their breathing gets disrupted for short periods when they sleep. This increases their risk of developing heart disease. Therefore, it is essential to treat this condition not only because of the person’s health but also because it poses risk to their marriages! In most of the cases, the spouse of a snoring partner sleeps in a separate bedroom! So, if you snore, take help of herbs.

Drinking tea – especially before falling asleep – can alleviate snoring. Nettle, lime blossom, sage and arnica should be particularly suitable. Sage is used for general respiratory problems. Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) tea is especially recommended if snoring is caused by pollen allergy. If the mucous membranes are swollen and you cannot breathe freely through your nose, nettle is a great help. Nettle leaves are a known antihistamine. When your sinus passage gets inflamed due to allergies of upper respiratory tract infections such as cold or sinusitis, you may snore a lot. Nettle leaf tea can be one of the best home remedies for snoring of such type.

Nettle leaf tea has bioflavonoids in it which opens up the sinuses and stabilizes white blood cells that make histamine. Just ensure to have dried nettle leaves for your tea.

To make nettle leaf tea for snoring, you‘ll need:

  • 1 tsp dried nettle leaf
  • 1 cup boiling water

Place the dried nettle leaves in a pot. Pour boiling water over it. Steep for 5 minutes. Strain and drink. Have 3 cups of nettle leaf tea daily.

Nettle is diuretic in nature. You may have to get up in the middle of the night to urinate.

Have a good snore-free sleep!

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Nettle for your Skin

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a nutritional powerhouse. More than 100 chemical components have been identified in nettle, including minerals as well as vitamins. Nettle also contains phytonutrients: chlorophyll, beta-carotene, lutein, quercetin, all of which are incredible for hair, nails and skin. Nettle is a natural beautifier herb. 

Let’s have a closer look at how nettle can help your skin!

Nettle has antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal effects as well as powerful antioxidant abilities that decrease oxidative stress in the body. It has been shown that nettle clears acne and eczema. Nettle is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and can be exceptionally helpful in easing skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. It is a wonderful remedy for easing itchy skin due to its action as a natural antihistamine.

Nettle tea has been used for women to treat hormone imbalances during and after pregnancy. It is pretty common among women that the biggest and most painful pimples tend to occur right before their period, at the same time that they are sobbing over subway delays, lack of candy, and world peace. Using nettle tea as a face tonic on those annoying pimples, makes them disappear before the end of the period.

Whether drinking nettle tea, eating a nettle dish or applying straight on your skin, it is beneficial for your body anyway. If you’d like to spend a little “me-time” focusing on your face, here is an easy recipe to make your own nettle powder face mask.

Ingredients:

  • 30 g French green clay powder 
  • 10 g Nettle leaf powder 
  • 3 drops of your favourite essential oil (rosemary, lavender, sage, yarrow or tea tree oil)
  • A jar for storing

Preparation:

Combine all the ingredients together into a jar. Mix well and store it away from sunlight. Be careful with the essential oil as it can be too strong and irritating for your skin. Use only 3 drops!

Use:

Combine 1 tbsp of face powder mix with approx 1 tsp of honey, milk or water or until you get a smooth paste that spreads well on your skin. Leave on for about 5 minutes or until almost dry. Remove by applying a warm, wet flannel over the area and then pressing off gently. 

Nettle tea is a must-have in your herbal apothecary! It is a simple plant with the amazing gift of the whole person’s wellbeing.

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Nettle for your Kids

Well, the new school year has started already. Kids are forced to sit for several hours a day in school, concentrating and learning a lot of new things that hopefully they will benefit from later on in their lives. Studying can be really tiring for a young, still-developing brain, that’s why sleeping and proper nutrition are necessary.

Giving your not too small little babies – they go to school already! – an extra mineral boost with a herbal infusion works great. Nettle is filled with nutrients that a kid needs, so it’s a great choice to prepare nettle for your kids. Nettle contains so much calcium that it is an excellent remedy for growing pains in children. And everyone needs a big refuel at lunchtime, so pack this nettle infusion to their lunch. This kid-friendly hydrating and mineral-rich herbal infusion recipe is for your family: 

Ingredients:

  • 3 tsp nettle
  • 2 tsp hibiscus
  • 1 litre of water
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 2 tsp honey 

Preparation:

Put the nettle and hibiscus at a mason jar, French Press, or teapot. Pour the cold water over the herbs and let them steep overnight. You can steep up to 24 hours if you wish. After the infusion has steeped, strain off the herbs and enjoy. You can add a squeeze of lemon and for the kids new to herbal tea you can drizzle in the raw honey. Just shake up the infusion and honey in a jar and it will dissolve.

Good herbal power for school!

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Prostate Cancer Awareness with Nettle Root

Nettle root (Urticae radix) has specific medicinal properties that are unique from those of the other parts of the plant. It contains sterols (β-sitosterol), lignans, secoisolariciresinol and polysaccharide-proteins.

The perennial roots are creeping, so nettle multiplies quickly. It is quite difficult to kill unnecessary nettles out of your garden. Nettle grows and spreads by stolons, which form a network of yellow, lateral, creeping rhizomes. These rhizomes are double-layered, consisting of an upper layer of young runners and a deeper layer of thicker, more fibrous roots.

These robust roots are easy to harvest and store, and they offer a number of medicinal uses. Nettle roots are usually harvested in autumn, before the soil hardens by winter frost. Nettle is anti-asthmatic: the juice of the roots (or leaves) mixed with honey, will relieve bronchial and asthmatic troubles. 

Nettle root was first used in urinary tract disorders in the 1950s. Stinging nettle root extract is often used in over-the-counter supplements and herbal remedies, particularly those labelled for “men’s health”.

The root extract contains β-sitosterol, a plant phenol that has been shown to reduce urinary tract complications associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) – the enlargement of the prostate.

Studies in people suggest that stinging nettle, in combination with other herbs (especially saw palmetto), may be effective at relieving symptoms such as reduced urinary flow, incomplete emptying of the bladder, post urination dripping, and the constant urge to urinate. These symptoms are caused by the enlarged prostate gland pressing on the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder). Scientists aren’t sure why nettle root reduces symptoms. It may be because it contains chemicals that affect hormones (including testosterone and estrogen), or because it acts directly on prostate cells. 

It is important to work with a doctor to treat BPH, and to make sure you have a proper diagnosis to rule out prostate cancer.

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Nettle for your Nails

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a nutritional powerhouse. More than 100 chemical components have been identified in nettle, including minerals as well as vitamins. Nettle also contains phytonutrients: chlorophyll, beta-carotene, lutein, quercetin, all of which are incredible for hair, skin and nails. Nettle is a natural beautifier herb. 

Let’s have a closer look at how nettle can help your nails!

Vitamin C is widely regarded as great for nails, so it’s great that nature provides us with nettle which contains a lot of it. Nettle also contains vitamin A, that enhances the production of keratin – the main building blocks of nails – and protects them from the destructive influence of toxins.

You can find nettle based dietary supplements in every health store to promote your nail growth and strength, but if you don’t want to spend too much money on them, you have an easy homemade option to increase nail health.

You can soak your nails in a strong nettle tea. Just brew the tea stronger than when made for drinking (add 3-4 teaspoons) and soak the nails for approximately 15 minutes once a week. You can also add oil and mix it with tea. Olive oil is an extremely moisturising and healing oil and is easily absorbed into the skin making it an excellent choice for nails. Another good choice for nails is grapeseed oil that is loaded with antioxidants, vitamin E, vitamin C, beta-carotene and vitamin D. 

After a few weeks of nettle tea and oil treatment, your nails will be beautiful, healthy, and strong.

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Beat allergies with Nettle

If you have seasonal allergies, you know they can be challenging, the symptoms can become difficult to tolerate.

Allergic rhinitis is increasingly common. Although this shares the same symptoms as hayfever, these can occur all year round rather than just through the pollen season. Allergic rhinitis can also be triggered by house dust mites, animal hair, traffic fumes, plant moulds, feathers in pillows, cleaning materials, air fresheners, perfumes, aftershaves and deodorants.

Allergies are an immune response to an otherwise harmless substance that comes into contact with cells in the mucus membranes of your nose, mouth, throat, lungs, stomach, and intestines. In a person with allergies, this ends up triggering the release of the chemical histamine. Histamine is a part of the immune system that causes all the symptoms you associate with allergies. Antihistamines block histamine activity, seeking to stop the allergic reaction.

Many allergy medications on the shelves of the drugstores work as antihistamines. But there are also certain foods and plant extracts that may similarly block the effects of histamine.

Did you know that stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a natural antihistamine?

If allergic rhinitis brings out itchy skin, bumpy red rashes or inflamed skin you may benefit from nettle. Nettle tea and nettle tincture are widely available. But nettle soup made from freshly harvested nettle leaves is also a great help to ease allergy symptoms.

For a nettle tea, measure one teaspoon of dried nettle to one cup of boiling water. Allow it to steep for 10 minutes, then strain and drink. 

3 cups of nettle tea a day gonna blow your allergy away! 🙂

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Eco-Textile Made Of Nettle

In some parts of the world you can sleep between nettle sheets, eat off a nettle tablecloth, dine in nettle-enriched steaks and eggs ordered from a nettle-paper menu, in an emergency fish with a nettle line, and in the springtime especially revel with delectable nettle dishes washed down with nettle beer. In fact, this is only a portion of this wild edible’s capabilities”. ~ Angier

Nettle is among those plants – beside bamboo, eucalyptus, cedar and Indian lotus – in the world that has several areas of use. It is not only a common herb that you can make tea of, but nettle kept generations alive and healthy by providing food, drink, paper, clothes and other equipment for surviving in the wild (e.g. fishing net).

Prehistoric textiles were made of nettle, started to spread in the Bronze Age and were popular again during the World Wars, mostly because it was the only available material for clothes. It was widely presumed that production of plant fiber textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture. Researchers discovered that ancient people were conscious users of wild plants too, they not only used cultivated flax and hemp to make clothes. They even trade nettle textiles in the continent. The nettle cloth found in Denmark – tells a surprising story about long-distance Bronze Age trade connections around 800 BC – was made in Austria.

The royals favoured the finest nettle in their clothes and home textiles, the use of which was forbidden from the rest of the citizens! The nettle fibres were a highly respected fibres among the people.

Today, the world population is on increase, but land doesn’t. The demand for sustainable textiles is increasing, which is great news. By converting nettle stalks into a linen-like fabric, some companies have started to create an eco-fabric out of natural rather than synthetic materials and employ thousands of artisans across the globe. Their project has benefits beyond the current generation. With the success in nettle eco-fiber production, they will reduce the need for conventional fiber and in turn the amount of greenhouse gases produced during conventional fiber production.

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Nettle Beer

6th August 2021 International Beer Day

International Beer Day is a global celebration of beer, taking place in pubs, breweries, and backyards all over the world. It’s a day for beer lovers everywhere to celebrate the craft of brewing and to show appreciation for those involved in the making of beer.

The majority of beers on the market today are either ales or lagers. Lagers tend to have a more smooth and mellow flavor, while ales are more full-bodied and slightly bitter, due to the yeast and fermentation process. Lagers are fermented for longer at lower temperatures, while ales are fermented at higher temperatures for a shorter period of time.

The hop (Humulus lupulus), which is now the quintessential aromatic and bittering herb of our contemporary beers, was often completely unknown in some brewing areas of Europe. In fact, hopped beer has only been popular in the UK for the last five hundred years. Instead, brewers relied on a healthy collection of herbs. This was the unhopped Gruit Ale. For example, yarrow ale was the traditional wedding beer in some cultures. 

Today, Gruit is making a comeback, as many breweries are riding a wave of interest in speciality beers. There are hundreds of ingredients they use to taste beers, like fruits and herbs.

The Celts have started to use nettle (Urtica dioica) for making beer as far back as the Bronze Age. The brewing of nettle beer is mostly unrecorded, probably because it was strictly a rural activity carried out by the poor and illiterate. Most recipes miss out both hops and malt. 

Modern enthusiastic foragers who become talented homebrewers, usually use fresh nettle tops, ginger, lemon or orange to make nettle beer. If you are planning to impress your friends and loved ones with your homemade nettle beer on International Beer Day, you can find several nettle beer recipes on the internet. Don’t hesitate to brew your own beer!

Happy International Beer Day!

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World Nature Conservation Day

World Nature Conservation Day is observed on July 28 across the world to raise awareness about protecting the natural resources. Nature is facing huge problems like deforestation, illegal wildlife trade, conventional intensive farming, loss of biodiversity, pollution, etc. Everyone must promote environment-friendly activities in their daily life to lead a Green Lifestyle. Together, we can make an effective change for a cleaner, greener future where we help nature and nature helps us.

“Nature doesn’t need people – people need nature; nature would survive the extinction of the human being and go on just fine, but human culture, human beings, cannot survive without nature.” ~ Harrison Ford

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a very popular herbal ingredient in natural cosmetics. It contains a lot of minerals and vitamins (A and E) that are essential in the health of the skin, hair and nails. You can find nettle soap, nettle shampoo, nettle face mask, and even nettle nail oil in the natural cosmetic market. The internet is filled with homemade nettle product recipes if you want to make your own beauty care products. You can reduce your ecological footprint if you reduce your artificial, unhealthy chemicals that would harm the environment. With this, you lower your plastic waste too!

There is a complicated connection net between species – an ecological interdependence. Nettle supports over 100 species of insects, including butterflies and moths as a food source. Sir David Attenborough has called on gardeners to plant a wild flower meadow and cultivate a nettle patch to help butterflies struggling to survive the wet summer in the UK.

Nettle is among the major sources of green plant material consumed in the field by the snails. They all know that nettle is tasty and full of nutrients. The presence of stinging fibers on nettle acts as a defense against many grazing animals, creating a comfortable habitat for our beneficial friends, some of whom are pollinators. The community of organisms depending on nettle is very large. Just think of all the predatory insects, spiders, amphibians and birds which take advantage of this feast.

Let’s plant nettle in our gardens to help nature!

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Nettle Cheeses

20 July International Cheese Day

Blessed be the cheesemakers, for they shall inherit the earth!” ~ Life of Brian

There are lots of types of cheese in the market and the cheese making businesses are blooming worldwide. The biggest cheese consumer countries are in Europe, in addition the tradition of cheese making as well a part of many European cultures.

Did you know that nettle is essential in many cheeses?

There are some award winner cheeses – lots of them from the UK – that contain nettle (Urtica dioica) leaves, but nettle is more common in other not specifically nettle cheeses too. Why?

Cheese makers use nettle in the coagulation process of milk. The chemical content found in nettle is used to acidify the milk and lower its pH in order to make the curd, separating solid and fluid fraction of milk. Using nettle rennet is an ancient form of milk coagulation. It’s simple to make, easy to use and a great vegetarian alternative to animal-derived rennet. 

There are two main types of rennet: animal and plant based rennet. The primary enzyme (chymosin) in animal rennet is collected from the lining of the fourth stomach of a newborn calf. The enzyme is produced there to help baby cows digest milk. It can be a problem for vegetarians. That is why the use of ancient nettle rennet is coming back. When this type of rennet is used, it makes the cheese vegetarian.

Let’s see some nettle cheeses that worth mentioning:

Cornish Yarg Cheese is wrapped in nettle leaves and allowed to age about 6 weeks, which will result a semi hard cheese made from grass rich Cornish milk. The cheeses are sold still wrapped in the nettle leaves, under which the crust of the cheese is green with grey, white or green mould. Inside, the pale yellow cheese is creamy under the crust, firm towards the middle, and slightly crumbly in the middle. The crust is edible. The cheese has a slightly lemony taste.

Northumberland Nettle Cheese is made with cows’ milk with the addition of real nettles. It is made with vegetarian rennet, and the addition of nettles encourages the beautiful creaminess of the Gouda-influenced cheese. This cheese is matured for 3 months which allows the subtle flavor to develop. It’s fabulous with courgette on a vegetarian pizza!

Teifi Nettle Cheese is made with nettles that are added during the cheese making process. The nettle has a light herby and distinct flavor that makes it a very unique cheese. This award-winning artisan cheese is made from the finest organic raw milk.

Happy International Cheese Day!